Typography - Jasmine Dowling

Typography - Jasmine Dowling

 

 

Every now and then when working for myself I sit down in a moment of stress and wonder why I don't just go and work for someone else. I know I'm not the only self employed person to do this and so far the pros of working for myself have won out. Today we chat about the pros and cons of being your own boss. I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below!


 Q2. Working for yourself is full of rewards, and equally a struggle sometimes. What are some of the things you find most rewarding and most difficult?

Jasmine Dowling - Typographer & Blogger www.jasminedowling.com - The most rewarding thing is that most days I get to create and even if every day I am not working on the most exciting project, doing so still gives me the freedom to spend my other time creating whatever I like. I feel like it is bitter sweet when it comes to being self employed because it is all up to you. On one hand you can ‘do whatever you want’ but at the same time you really can’t. No one is going to reply to 50 emails for you while you try to madly finish a deadline. There is a lot of responsibility when it comes to running a business and outside of creating you have accounting, marketing, legal & communication to do as well as the work itself. That can overwhelm the best of us.

Adam Bryce - Photographer www.adamcharliebryce.com - Most rewarding is the 'doing', the actual shooting, I started my career as a stylist, became a creative director and finally starting taking photos. Photography is the first thing I've done that makes me smile while I work. The negatives are a funny thing to think about, I'm always complaining about the negatives, but when I stop and think I'm just so lucky to be able to do what I do, but seeing as you ask... the things I find difficult tend to revolve around money, and the admin of it, but I'm also not a big fan of the politics within the fashion industry.

Sonny & Biddy - illustrators at We Buy Your Kids , also working at Ludlow Gallery  Up top of the "Rewards" list is opportunity, to travel, to meet amazing people and other creative people.The biggest struggle is probbaly Balance. Balance between work and downtime. Finding time as a couple and still running a successful business is the goal. Also, remembering why you wanted to do this. We are 10 years into WBYK, we’ve had such an amazing journey but you can forget sometimes where it all came from.

Beci Orpin - Illustrator & Art Director www.beciorpin.com - Being your own boss and deciding when you work/ when you don’t, who you work for / who you don’t etc is pretty great. Most difficult is cash flow - still after 20 years in freelance I still haven’t nailed it! It’s so unpredictable, which is super annoying. 

Ryan Romanes - Graphic Designer www.ryanromanes.com - Having flexibility in my work hours and location are the ultimate self-employment perks. This has really influenced the type of work I’m doing and the clients I have. I enjoy being completely involved in the process from meeting the client, conceptualising ideas, designing and the production management. The great thing about self employment is retaining full credit to your work, it permits a personal investment that you don’t always get in a studio environment where so many stakeholders influence the end result. But working alone can also be isolating. It’s important to share your work regularly and get feedback from friends you trust, otherwise you run the risk of creating self indulgent work. Something I find challenging is presenting quotes or proposals that are tailored to a specific client’s requirements. This can take a lot of time, especially for branding projects where clients often struggle to  effectively communicate their needs. It’s important to spend time to fully understand the project before committing your services. I have been working with some of the same clients for longer than 3 years because they’re a pleasure to work with. But others have lasted 3 months and then I’m out.

 

Photo - Adam Bryce

Photo - Adam Bryce

Shoes - Beci Orpin for Gorman

Shoes - Beci Orpin for Gorman